One of the contemporary Nashville scene's most prolific producers, Jim Ed Norman also played a key role in the development of the West Coast country-rock sound of the 1970s. Born October 16, 1948 in Fort Edwards, Florida, he first surfaced playing keyboards in the little-known outfit the Felicity, which played the Texarkana circuit during the mid-1960s and issued their lone single "Hurtin'" in 1967. The group, which also included future Eagles frontman Don Henley on drums, evolved into Shiloh in 1969, soon relocating to the Los Angeles area, where they helped pioneer country-rock with their self-titled 1970 debut LP. Shiloh soon disbanded, and a few years later Norman resurfaced as an arranger and pianist on Eagles albums including 1974's On the Border and its follow-up, One of These Nights; from there, he moved on to also work with Linda Ronstadt and Country Joe MacDonald. Norman's production career began during the late 1970s on albums from the New Riders of the Purple Sage, the Coon Elder Band and Rains & Harris; in 1979, he teamed with Anne Murray for her LP New Kind of Feeling, followed two years later by her Christmas Wishes. Material for Glenn Frey, Mickey Gilley, Jennifer Warnes, Michael Martin Murphey and Johnny Lee followed during the first half of the 1980s, and in 1986 Norman began a lengthy collaboration with Hank Williams Jr. which yielded a series of hit LPs including 1987's Born to Boogie, 1988's Wild Streak, 1990's Lone Wolf and 1991's Pure Hank. Norman's concurrent success with performers ranging from Kenny Rogers to Beth Nielsen Chapman to Kathie Lee Gifford eventually led to his appointment as president of Warner/Reprise's Nashville offices. ~ Jason Ankeny, Rovi