Carrie Underwood’s Debut CD Pounces Into Top Album Spot

CMA Awards Show, Johnny Cash Movie Reverberate Through Charts

Turn down the stove, Mama. The charts are boiling over.

The clamor surrounding the CMA Awards show in New York and the premiere of the Johnny Cash biopic, Walk the Line, is reflected throughout this week’s Billboard country albums and singles charts.

The biggest news, though, is that Carrie Underwood’s first CD, Some Hearts, sold 314,549 copies in its first week of release to knock Kenny Chesney’s The Road and the Radio off the top of the album ranking. As further evidence of her musical strength, the 2005 American Idol winner also pranced in at No. 2 on the Billboard 200 all-genre list. Madonna’s new project, Confessions on a Dance Floor, debuted at the top of the pop list.

On the singles side, Dierks Bentley’s “Come a Little Closer” becomes his second No. 1 single. (His first was “What Was I Thinkin’” in September 2003). Bentley’s Twittyesque come-on dislodges Keith Urban’s “Better Life,” which spent six straight weeks at the top.

Big & Rich’s Comin’ to Your City parades onto the charts at No. 3. The other Top 5 albums are Chesney’s The Road and the Radio at No. 2; Martina McBride’s Timelsss, which drops from No. 3 to No. 4; and Rascal Flatts’ Feels Like Today, which slides from No. 3 to No. 5. (Both McBride’s and Rascal Flatts’ albums are former No. 1′s.)

Among the albums apparently benefiting from their creators’ appearances on the CMA Awards are Urban’s Be Here, which bounds from No. 11 to No. 6; Brad Paisley’s Time Well Wasted, from No. 17 to No. 12; Brooks & Dunn’s Hillbilly Deluxe, from No. 25 to No. 15; Miranda Lambert’s Kerosene, from No. 34 to No. 25; Lee Ann Womack’s There’s More Where That Came From, from No. 68 to No. 32; and Alison Krauss & Union Station’s Lonely Runs Both Ways, from No. 55 to No. 44.

Womack’s Greatest Hits returns to the chart at No. 67 and Brooks & Dunn’s The Greatest Hits Collection II re-enters at No. 63. (For reasons having nothing at all to do with the CMA’s, Delbert McClinton’s long-absent Cost of Living also makes a comeback — at No. 72.).

Probably boosted by Garth Brooks’ Times Square performance of “Good Ride Cowboy” during the CMA Awards, Chris LeDoux’s Anthology, Volume 1 ascends from No. 70 to No. 61. “Good Ride Cowboy” is Brooks’ musical tribute to the late singer-songwriter-rodeo cowboy.

Cash-wise, the soundtrack album to Walk the Line makes its debut at a respectable No. 17, while Cash’s own The Legend vaults from No. 69 to No. 48 and Walking the Line: The Legendary Sun Sessions enters at No. 66.

Finally, we have our first holiday-album charting of the season — the various artists collection, Thomas Kinkade: Country Christmas, which skates in at No. 71.

Now, back to the singles. Chesney’s “Who You’d Be Today” lingers at No. 2 for the third week. Joe Nichols’ “Tequila Makes Her Clothes Fall Off” holds at No. 3 for its second week. Urban’s seemingly unquenchable “Better Life” slumps to No. 4. And Brooks’ “Good Ride Cowboy” rides into the No. 5 spot.

Among this week’s notable movers are Underwood’s “Jesus, Take the Wheel,” which accelerates from No. 18 to No. 14; Sugarland’s “Just Might (Make Me Believe),” from No. 22 to No. 19; Paisley and Dolly Parton’s “When I Get Where I’m Going,” from No. 23 to No. 20; Montgomery Gentry’s “She Don’t Tell Me To,” from No. 28 to No. 24; Brooks & Dunn’s “Believe,” from No. 33 to No. 29; Sara Evans’ “Cheatin’,” from No. 36 to No. 32; Rockie Lynne’s “Lipstick,” from No. 45 to No. 39; Wynonna’s “Attitude,” from No. 44 to No. 40; and SHeDAISY’s “I’m Takin’ the Wheel,” from No. 57 to No. 45.

The highest-charting new single this week is Urban’s “Tonight I Wanna Cry,” which makes its official bow at No. 42. Bon Jovi and Sugarland’s Jennifer Nettles, who sang together on the CMA show, step onto the chart at No. 48 with “Who Says You Can’t Go Home.”

The remaining new entries are Jason Aldean’s “Why,” No. 49; Womack’s “Twenty Years and Two Husbands Ago,” No. 56; Jamie O’Neal’s “I Love My Life,” No. 58; and Carolina Rain’s “Let’s Get It On,” No. 60.

May all your bells jingle.