Miranda Lambert Gets the Platinum Treatment

Label Honors Star for a Career's Worth of Achievements

A stream of carefully-screened guests took elevators to the ninth-floor party room of Nashville’s ritzy Icon condominium complex Friday night (Feb. 4) to celebrate Miranda Lambert‘s career-spanning musical successes.

From the metallic-tinged guitar that stood atop a pyramid of gourmet cupcakes on a table at the entryway to Lambert’s shimmering, form-fitting dress, the party’s theme was “platinum,” a term in music-industry parlance that signifies a million-selling single or album.

While they waited for the guest of honor to arrive, the celebrants grazed on mini fried chicken fritters on herbed brioche buns, mini corndogs, macaroni and cheese balls, crudité shots with parmesan ranch dressing (vegetable sticks) and the aforementioned cupcakes.

“This is an incredibly special night,” proclaimed Gary Overton, head of Lambert’s label, Sony Music Nashville, when he took the stage to introduce her. “We have multiple awards for Miranda.”

Indeed, he did. The first he presented her was a platinum digital single plaque for sales of “Gunpowder & Lead.” Next came the platinum digital single for “The House That Built Me.”

“There’s so many,” Lambert pouted in mock dismay.

At this point, Tom Douglas and Allen Shamblin, who wrote “The House That Built Me,” came forward to give her a painting of a house inspired by the song. “You can put that on your bus, maybe,” said Douglas.

Overton had two more trophies to hand out: a platinum album for Crazy Ex-Girlfriend and a plaque with images of all three of Lambert’s albums to date — Kerosene, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend and Revolution — each of which has sold or shipped 1 million copies.

Lambert’s manager, Marion Kraft, stood beside her as she acknowledged members of her support team standing in the crowd. She beckoned producer Frank Liddell, to the stage for special recognition.

Lambert said that when she asked Liddell to produce her first album, he replied, “You’re making the worst mistake of your career.” This didn’t deter her. “I told him I don’t care. I don’t have a career anyway.”

Obviously, things have changed.