Sam Hunt’s Montevallo Is Week’s Best-Selling Album — Again

Blake Shelton’s “Lonely Tonight” Rolls In as Most-Played Song

Pop a top again.

After a two-week timeout, Sam Hunt’s Montevallo has again popped to the top of Billboard’s country albums chart.

And after 16 weeks of climbing, Blake Shelton’s “Lonely Tonight” (featuring Ashley Monroe) has scrambled into the No. 1 spot on the country airplay rankings.


The only new album in this week’s Top 50 is from a familiar — but long absent — name. Shania Twain’s Shania: Still the One: Live From Las Vegas debuts at No. 31.

Twain first hit the country charts in 1993 with “What Made You Say That.” The song went only to No. 55, but its accompanying music video established the Canadian songstress as one of country’s most glamorous performers, a distinction she would hold for the rest of the decade.

More to the point, though, her albums sold in the tens of millions, back when albums were physical objects.

Returning to chart action this week are Eric Paslay’s self-titled album at No. 46 and Kenny Rogers10 Great Songs: 20th Century Masters: The Millennium Collection at No. 49.

Five new songs make their entrances: Gary Allan’s “Hangover Tonight” (No. 50), Jana Kramer’s “I Got the Boy” (No. 54), LoCash’s “I Love This Life” (No. 56), Eli Young Band’s “Turn It On” (No. 58) and Montgomery Gentry’s “Folks Like Us” (No. 60).

Rounding out the Top 5 albums, in descending order, are Aaron Watson’s The Underdog (last week’s No. 1), Jason Aldean’s Old Boots, New Dirt, Florida Georgia Line’s Anything Goes and Carrie Underwood’s Greatest Hits: Decade #1.

The No. 2 through No. 5 songs are Thomas Rhett’s “Make Me Wanna” (last week’s No. 1), Aldean’s “Just Gettin’ Started,” Randy Houser’s “Like a Cowboy” and Brett Eldredge’s “Mean to Me.”


By the way, for all you country newcomers, the “pop a top” reference at the top of this column is to Jim Ed Brown’s 1967 hit of that name. (Of course, Alan Jackson had a hit with it again in 1999.)

Give it a listen. Written by the late Nat Stuckey, it’s still one of the best drinking songs around, even if the beer-packaging technology which inspired it has moved ahead.

Edward Morris is a veteran of country music journalism. He lives in Nashville, Tennessee, and is a frequent contributor to CMT.com.