Even Jana Kramer Is Getting Mommy-Shamed

Commercial Baby Food Is Not the Bad Guy

Just stop. Enough is enough. Motherhood is enough of a juggling act without throwing some mommy-shamers into the mix.

And yet, when Jana Kramer posted a photo of her first baby food purchase, there they were.

Some moms started telling her she was starting Jolie on solid foods too early and that Kramer should make her own homemade baby food.

Kramer was quick to defend herself, posting a photo of a handwritten note that read, “Dear Mommy Shamers, Unless you are Jolie’s doctor, her father or her mom, do NOT tell me how to raise my child or how to feed her. Sincerely, Jolie’s MOM.”

A photo posted by Jana Kramer (@kramergirl) on

She added a caption, too.

“I have been very open with pictures of my daughter and our journey because my true fans have been on my journey from day one, and I want them to be a part of my new journey now. If you have negative comments about how I parent my child, keep it to yourself!!”

She’s right. Not just about keeping the negative comments off of her Instagram page, but about being totally OK with jarred baby food as well.

The American Academy of Pediatrics, a group that knows a thing or two about baby food, says commercially-prepared vegetables are actually safer than they kind you might puree in your own kitchen because they aren’t as likely to be contaminated with plant-based nitrates which can cause can cause anemia in babies.

Another point in favor of baby food is that it is fortified, usually with vitamin C. Homemade food is not.

Then there is texture. The first fruits and veggies you give your baby need to be very smoothly pureed. The homemade kind isn’t always as developmentally appropriate as the kind in jars.

There is also the question of nutrition. If you buy a carrot today to puree for baby tomorrow, do you know how long ago it was picked? Because on its way from the farm to the grocery store to your kitchen, essential vitamins can get lost. The FDA also warns that once fruits and vegetables have been harvested, they can become contaminated.

And lastly, contrary to the mommy-shamers belief, baby food is not packed with artificial preservatives.

Alison makes her living loving country music. She's based in Chicago, but she's always leaving her heart in Nashville.