LANCO Celebrates Its First No. 1 “Greatest Love Story”

Party Offers Respite from Nashville’s Teeth-chattering Cold

Brass monkeys were spotted among the crowd Thursday afternoon (Jan. 4) as it scurried along the subfreezing sidewalks of Nashville’s Music Row and into the BMI building to celebrate the band LANCO‘s first No. 1 single, “Greatest Love Story.”

The weather apps said “Sunny 23°,” but the sun might as well have been a paper moon for all the good it did.

Inside, it was a different story. A stage had been set up in the center of the cavernous reception hall and was already cluttered with LANCO’s guitars, keyboards amps and mics.

Crisply uniformed bartenders circulated among the guests, offering red and white wines, while off to the side a buffet of spicy Mexican foods awaited.

After allowing the guests a half hour to mingle and warm up, BMI’s associate director of creative services, Josh Tomlinson, took the stage to tout LANCO’s upcoming tour and announce that the band’s first album, Hallelujah Nights, will be released Jan. 18.

Greatest Love Story by LANCO on VEVO.

Unlike most country hits these days, “Greatest Love Story” was written by a single composer — in this instance the band’s leader, Brandon Lancaster. As is BMI custom, Lancaster was presented an Epiphone guitar in recognition of his first chart-topper.

A representative of the Country Music Association awarded the band members No. 1 medallions, and a spokesman for Pinnacle Bank, which co-sponsors BMI’s No. 1 parties, said that the bank donated to Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital in LANCO’s name.

But the big news came when a representative of LANCO’s record label declared that “Greatest Love Story” has been certified platinum — a designation signifying the sale of a million units. What makes the certification unusual is that it was achieved before the album’s release.

After all the plaques, medallions and kindred expressions of esteem had been handed out. The members of LANCO remained onstage to entertain the partygoers with a generous sampling of its music.

Given the band’s energy and the frigid temperature lying in ambush outside, it’s no wonder that many in the crowd lingered — opting for another glass of wine and at least one more chicken fajita.

Edward Morris is a veteran of country music journalism. He lives in Nashville, Tennessee, and is a frequent contributor to CMT.com.