Buck Owens Nationalized Country’s Roots Into a Timelessly Pop-Appealing Style

Owens innovated a sound and style that has not weathered against the stand of time and country music's evolutions

Dinosaur Victrola, listenin’ to Buck Owens
Doo, doo, doo, lookin’ out my back door

When listening to rock band Creedence Clearwater Revival’s 1970-released, top-five Billboard Hot 100 hit “Lookin’ Out My Backdoor,” the mention of listening to country icon Buck Owens on an antiquated record plater — as accompanied by a shotgunning drum rhythm and honky-tonk style guitar playing — creates a vibe and feel that timelessly introduces exactly who and what the El Cerrito, California-based rock quartet are and are attempting to embody musically.

Making pop music that mirrors the legacy that Buck Owens — especially in the years between 1963-1968 — created in country music is smart. The country hitmaker innovated a sound and style that has not weathered against the stand of time but also has withstood country music’s persistent desire to adapt to musical evolution.

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